The visually captivating and thought-provoking Festival of Recorded Movement (F-O-R-M) celebrated their 2nd year running on June 16 and 17th, 2017 in Vancouver, BC. Craft of Lyfe was a proud sponsor of the local festival that unites creativity, videography, movement, and collaboration across international artists. Ranging from contemporary dance to skateboarding, F-O-R-M featured work by youth as young as 15 years old, up to performers and producers in their late 20’s. COL’s Flory Huang was starry-eyed amongst the international roster of talent and repped COL tees throughout the 2-day events.

We sat down with for a debrief on the weekend’s highlights in-screenings and at the after parties:

 

Q: What was the biggest takeaway for you from F-O-R-M?
A: Inspiration. That was most people’s go-to summary for the festival! I spoke to a number of supporters, attendees, and creators who were in town for their screenings and all across the board, we were just in awe. To see diverse talent with powerful, impactful narratives and messages was absolutely fantastic. It really made me stop and think about the media I use as an artist and motivated me to continue to create and explore in my own practice.

 

Q: What were you top favorite 3 films?

A: In no particular order because I couldn’t even I tried, BONUM, Northbound, and MUTTER. I was really impressed with the diverse storytelling and stunning audio-visuals. I loved the complex peaks and falls throughout each film, too. You know you’ve just watched something impactful when you’re still thinking and feeling it out day later.

 

Q: What was it like to see screenings that were commissioned?

A: So interesting to see such breadth across 5 films! The talk back panel was great for the commissioned artists to speak directly to their work and to/ with the audiences. People were able to ask questions about the films, the artists’ processes and intentions, and share their feedback.

Photo of the talk back panel by Flory Huang © 2017. The artist, Rachel McNamee featured on the big screen, was Skyped into the session with the rest of the panelists.

Q: What were the after parties like?

A: I was totally won over by the Cartems donuts and popcorn, personally. What’s a party without donuts? The celebratory vibes was super fun and it was great to see everyone getting to know each other. So many open-hearted individuals with the sickest personal styles and personality!


The Lululemon Lab was lovely, filled with more screenings and an interactive installation by the inspiring Chimerik Collective. What a great platform to meet new people and create realtime art with them, too!



The after-party at the Gold Saucer was super fun with Vancouver’s own Raincity Blue. I had chills when the band started playing Beyonce’s ‘All Night’- oh my god, they are SO talented! With more drinks (and more popcorn), we danced and sang the night away. I had tons of fun doing a few video interviews down the hallway!


Photo by Flory Huang © 2017.
Photo by Sammy Chien © 2017. Pictured here: Sabrina Comanescu (left), Sophia Wolfe (center), and Flory Huang (right).

Q: What do you have to say to or about F-O-R-M?

A: KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK! And thank you so much to everyone! The world needs more art, documentation, collaboration, and engagement. There are so many ways to exchange ideas and create discussions around global issues on many levels. I truly see that the language of the arts is a powerful one.


Q: Any notable remarks for F-O-R-M 2017?

A: I just feel super driven by and inspired about the bubbling, local talent and networks that are growing in Vancouver. I actually made friends with people that I might have not connected with otherwise. I felt really grateful to be meeting amazing people and to know that COL had a part in helping make it possible. It was great to see all the support across all ages and communities.

I’m excited for next year’s festival already and I look forward to continuing to support more people and organizations who are creating, collaborating, empowering, and educating.  


Craft of Lyfe strives to provide access to education and entrepreneurship through fashion. As part of our mindfulness and individual dreams, we believe in creating functional fashion and products that are ethically sourced. We believe in doing good business, collaborating with our communities and choosing to empower others who may not have the same opportunities or privilege.


F-O-R-M presents by-youth for-youth movement as an on-screen film festival. It is created through a collaboration between 24-year-old independent dance artist Sophia Wolfe, Company 605 and Kristina Lemieux. The festival encourages community-building through events, workshops and short films that inspire artists and audiences to see movement from new perspectives.

With low-cost weekend passes, adult tickets were $25 and $15 for youth ages 19 and under. F-O-R-M is an inclusive event, drawing young audiences and the general public interested in seeing new creative ideas emerge from this next generation. Content includes dance, skateboarding, running or any subject where physicality is central. F-O-R-M’s aim is to celebrate and support a rising generation of creators and enthusiasts through providing a formal context to both screen and talk about their work.  




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